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Posts for category: Foot Care

By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
July 27, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear   Shoes  
The Right ShoesWhen was the last time you bought new shoes? When was the last time you threw out shoes that were old and worn out? We often keep shoes long past the point where we should have retired them. Of course, other factors such as our age also play a role in the health of our feet, including our risk factors for developing certain conditions and also our footcare needs. Our feet have different needs and require different care as we get older. Here’s how to choose the appropriate shoes for all stages of life:
 
How Your Feet Change Over the Years

As we age, our feet will change shape and size, which can also predispose them to certain problems. This also means that your foot needs will change, particularly concerning footwear. Here’s how your feet will change:
  • Loss of fat pads
  • Dry, cracked skin
  • The development or worsening of certain deformities such as hammertoes or bunions
  • Widening or lengthening of the feet
  • Loss of bone density (which can increase your risk for fracture)
  • Changes in gait due to certain conditions such as neuropathy or arthritis
  • Diabetic-related foot problems
  • Issues with balance
Everyday Footwear for Aging Feet

You must look for shoes that provide proper cushioning and supportive insoles so that your feet can tackle the day-to-day activities. If you have foot problems or issues with gait, then you’ll want to turn to a podiatrist for an evaluation. Together, you can decide the proper footwear and whether prescription orthotics can also provide your feet with additional support and cushioning that footwear alone can’t.

You should turn to a specialty shoe store where they can analyze your gait, properly measure your feet, and determine whether the shoes you’re getting may require additional modifications including orthotics. For example, some shoes and brands adjust to foot swelling throughout the day, while others provide enough space to place orthotics.
 
There are also certain types of shoes that aging feet should avoid. Those include:
  • Any shoes with pointed toes
  • Shoes with heels over 2 inches
  • Shoes that aren’t non-slip
  • Sandals or flip-flops
  • Shoes that don’t have a firm sole (including your slippers)
  • Old, worn shoes (that simply need to be tossed)
  • Shoes with rocker soles (particularly if you have gait problems)
If you are having trouble finding the right shoes to fit your needs, or if you are interested in learning more about custom orthotics and how it could provide additional support for your feet, turn to your podiatrist today for the care your feet deserve.
By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
July 01, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Sprains   Sprained Ankle  

Sprained Ankle

Whether you simply stepped down awkwardly or you were in a sports-related accident, it could have left you with a painful, swollen ankle. Could it be a simple strain, or could you have sprained your ankle? If you even suspect that you might have a sprained ankle, or if you’ve never experienced an ankle injury before, it’s always a good idea to play it safe and to turn to a podiatrist right away for proper diagnosis and treatment.

How to Treat Sprained Ankles

Most minor sprains can be properly managed through simple at-home treatment and care. Conservative treatment is typically the first line of defense against minor ankle and foot problems, including minor sprains. While more moderate to severe sprains will require more aggressive attention and treatment options, the RICE method is ideal for most ankle sprains. Here’s what RICE stands for:

Rest

No matter the severity of your sprain, your podiatrist will be the first to tell you to stay off the ankle and to rest as much as possible to give the ankle time to heal. If the sprain is more moderate or severe, your podiatrist may recommend wearing a protective boot or using crutches to help stabilize the foot and ankle and take pressure off the ankle while standing or walking.

Ice

Especially for the first 72 hours after an ankle injury, it’s a good idea to use ice as much as possible to reduce swelling and pain. Wrap an ice pack in a towel and apply to the ankle for up to 20 minutes at a time. You can continue to do this every few hours throughout the day.

Compression

Your podiatrist can also show you the proper way to wrap and bandage your ankle, which not only promotes proper circulation and blood flow to the area to aid in healing but also can provide additional support and stabilization for the ankle. It’s important to know how to properly wrap your ankle to make sure it’s providing the very best support and your podiatrist can easily show you how.

Elevation

Whenever you at resting (which should be most of the day!), it’s a good idea to prop your injured ankle up above your heart to reduce inflammation and bruising. You should elevate your ankle for at least a couple of hours each day!

If you are in pain, over-the-counter NSAID pain relievers can be great for reducing pain, swelling, and inflammation. For more severe sprains, your podiatrist may prescribe something stronger. Patients with more moderate-to-severe sprains may require physical therapy and rehabilitation to help rebuild and strengthen the ligaments, tendons, and muscles of the ankle.

Knowing you have a proper treatment plan in place can provide you with the peace of mind you need to know that your ankle will heal properly. Don’t ignore any foot or ankle injuries. Turn to your podiatrist right away for sprained ankles, or any other problems you may be facing.
By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
April 26, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Foot  
Diabetic FeetWhen it comes to diabetes nothing is more important than living a healthy lifestyle and taking the proper medications to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing health complications. Along with turning to a regular doctor and endocrinologist, it’s important that you also add a podiatrist to your team of specialists to monitor and maintain good foot health.

Why is foot health important?

People with diabetes are at a much greater risk for developing serious problems such as nerve damage, loss of sensation, ulcers, and decreased circulation. This chronic condition also increases your risk for infections. Even small cuts and minor blisters can lead to a serious infection if left untreated.

This is why it’s important that any changes to your feet, even minor ones, are addressed and treated by a podiatrist rather than trying to treat the problem yourself. By turning to a podiatrist you can prevent further complications from happening.

How do I care for diabetic feet?

There are many things that you can do every day to maintain healthy, happy feet. This is something that your podiatrist can discuss with you when you come in for a comprehensive evaluation. Even if you have your diabetes properly controlled with medication, it’s still important to have a foot doctor that you can turn to for routine care, nail trimming, and more. Some tips for keeping diabetic feet healthy and problem-free include,
  • Washing feet with warm water and soap at least once a day. Make sure that you also clean between toes. Once your feet are thoroughly clean, also dry them off completely before applying moisturizer.
  • Never go barefoot, even indoors, as this could lead to an injury. Make sure to always check your shoes before putting them on to ensure that dirt or small objects may not be inside (as this can lead to injury).
  • Wear shoes that provide the proper fit. There are shoes designed specifically for those with diabetes; however, as long as you wear shoes that provide protection, optimal support, and the ideal fit, this is all you need.
  • You should always have your feet examined by a podiatrist at least once a year to check blood flow and to make sure that there are no issues. If you have trouble trimming your nails properly, you can also turn to a podiatrist who will do it for you.
If you are living with diabetes and you don’t have a podiatrist that you turn to, you must find one that you trust. Foot problems can occur out of nowhere, and when they do, a foot doctor is going to be the specialist you’ll need to turn to right away.
By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
February 01, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Care   Dry Feet  
At-Home Care for Dry FeetDry, flaky feet are incredibly common, particularly during the cold, winter months; however, if you find yourself dealing with dry or cracked feet throughout the year, especially around the heels, you may be wondering what you can do about it. Instead of just waiting until your feet become dry and flaky, your podiatrist can provide you with some easy skin care tips to keep your feet supple and free from dry skin all year long.
 
Wear Appropriate, Supportive Footwear

Certain shoes can leave you prone to cracked heels and dry skin due to friction from wearing loose-fitted shoes. People who wear sandals and other open-heeled shoes are more at risk for developing cracked heels. Instead, opt for closed-heeled shoes that fit properly and provide support.
 
Lose Excess Weight

If you are overweight, you may be surprised to discover that this could be contributing to your dry, cracked heels. This is because your feet take on all of your weight while standing, walking, and running. By safely dropping that excess weight through a healthy diet and regular exercise you can alleviate some of the pressure placed on your heels to reduce the risk of cracking.
 
Avoid Hot Showers

While we know just how luxurious it feels to stand in a steaming hot shower, especially during the winter months, this could be contributing to dry skin on your feet and cracked heels. If this is something you deal with regularly you may look at your current bathing or showering ritual to see if that could be the culprit. Simply use warm and not hot water, which can strip the skin of the oils it needs to stay moist.
 
Apply a Moisturizer

You should moisturize your feet every day to prevent dry skin from happening in the first place. Moisturizers that contain lactic acid, glycerin, or petroleum jelly can help to lock in moisture in your feet. Moisturize every time you get out of the shower and throughout the day, especially before going to bed. If you are prone to very dry, cracked feet, you may wish to moisturize and then wear socks to bed.
 
If these simple home measures don’t work, then you’ll want to consult your podiatrist to see if they can recommend a prescription-strength moisturizer or cream to reduce dryness and inflammation. Since dry, cracked feet can sometimes be a sign of an underlying health problem like diabetes, it’s a good idea to see your doctor if you’re dealing with this problem regularly.
 
While dry skin isn’t usually a concern for healthy individuals, if you have diabetes, you’ll need to be extra careful when it comes to treating even minor problems like dry, cracked, or flaky skin. To be on the safe side, it’s best to speak with a qualified podiatrist to find out how to treat cracked skin to prevent infection. Call your foot doctor today.
By DANIEL METHUSELAH, DPM
January 04, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Blisters  
What To Do About BlistersEverything from wearing shoes that are a little too loose to increasing the number of miles you run can leave you dealing with painful blisters on your feet. Blisters can be quite a nuisance, making it difficult to move around, especially when wearing shoes. If you deal with blisters rather regularly here are some simple ways to treat the problem.
 
Keep the Blister Intact

If possible, try to keep the blister intact. Do not try to pop or drain a blister that hasn’t popped on its own. It’s important not to put pressure on the blister, so avoid any shoes that may be too tight. If you’re going to put on shoes, make sure to apply a bandage (some band-aids are designed specifically for covering blisters) to the area first.
 
Keep Popped Blisters Clean

If the blister popped on its own, clean it with warm water soap (do not use alcohol or hydrogen peroxide on the blister). Once the area is clean, apply an over-the-counter antibiotic cream to the area and apply a bandage over the blister. These simple steps can prevent an infection from occurring.
 
Drain the Blister Yourself

You should only drain a blister if it’s very large, painful, or affects your ability to move. In this case, you should sterilize a needle with alcohol and then make a small hole in the blister to let it drain. You may need to carefully squeeze the blister to help it drain fully. Once the blister has drained, rinse out the area with soap and warm water before applying antibiotic cream to the area and placing a bandage over it.
 
Replace Bandages Daily

You mustn’t keep the same bandage on your blister day in and day out. You should check the blister every day to make sure it isn’t infected. You should clean the area daily with soap and water and then reapply another bandage.
 
Of course, if you have diabetes or nerve damage in your feet, you mustn't try to drain or treat the blister yourself. Even something as small as a blister could become infected or lead to serious complications. You should see your podiatrist right away for any blisters that develop on your feet.
 
If you develop signs of infection such as pus, increased redness, or swelling of the blister, you must see your podiatrist right away for treatment. While blisters aren’t usually a cause for concern in most healthy individuals, it’s also important that you practice good foot care to prevent blisters from happening.